1863 Letter - Lieutenant William Jackman, 14th Maine - Victories at Port Hudson, Vicksburg "Beginning of the End of the War" - Unaware of Gettysburg Victory

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1863 Letter - Lieutenant William Jackman, 14th Maine - Victories at Port Hudson, Vicksburg "Beginning of the End of the War" - Unaware of Gettysburg Victory

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Item No. 9692833

An interesting July 1863 letter written by Lieutenant William Jackman of the 14th Maine Volunteers. He reported the surrender of Port Hudson and considered the victory, along with the victory at Vicksburg, to be a turning point in the war. He then turned his attention to the war in Virginia and his hopes for “Old Hooker.” It is evident Jackman was not yet aware that George Meade had replaced Hooker as commander of the Army of the Potomac, or that Lee’s invasion of Pennsylvania had been reversed at Gettysburg a week prior to the writing of this letter. Jackman wrote that he was looking forward to some rest following the difficult campaign. The letter reads:

Port Hudson July 10 1863

Dear Nancy
Port Hudson surrendered on the 8th. Now that Vicksburg and Port Hudson has surrendered I think that it is the beginning of the end of the war. At any rate the fighting is about done up out this way. There is only a few scattering rebels about here now. I think it will be hard to find them. I long to hear from Old Hooker if he has success you may depend on it. The war will soon end for the rebels cannon raise any more trips this way and it will be hard for them to raise troops any where if Hooker beats them. These two Victories are the most complete of any gained during the war. The country will have great reason to rejoice.

We are now waiting orders. Don’t know where we shall be sent next. We have had a hard time for two months. I am now to have time to clean up and rest a few weeks. My health has been very good during the siege aside from being trouble with the chills and rheumatism a little but I am all right now. I have seen enough of war to satisfy me. We have green corn here now and I see some watermelon too. I long to be at home again to ramble with the boys a fishing and berrying. I could enjoy it.

I suppose you have borrowed some trouble about my safety by not hearing from me no oftener, but I write as often as I could, hope I shall have better privileges now.

I hope Adelbert has got a good garden and that he keeps the weeds out of it and takes care of the apple trees. Hope the children are all good. I suppose Helen is trying her skill on the Piano. I hope she will succeed. Truly Yours
Wm Jackman

I shall write again as soon as we get settled down again. I do not get your letters very regular. Ira got letters as late as the 15th and I do not understand why yours did not come along with them unless you neglected to mail them in season for the mondays mail. I do not like to have letters to come along behind the time.
W. J.

The letter was written on three pages of a stationery sheet measuring about 5” x 8”. It is in excellent condition with minor foxing and toning. Creased where originally folded. Includes original stamped cover with July 15 New Orleans postmark.

Jackman would be killed in battle September 19, 1864 at Third Winchester.

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