Meade Takes Command - June 28, 1863 Army of the Potomac Broadside - Gettysburg

doc-gen-order-meade-gettysburg1.jpg
doc-gen-order-meade-gettysburg2.jpg
doc-gen-order-meade-gettysburg1.jpg
doc-gen-order-meade-gettysburg2.jpg
sold out

Meade Takes Command - June 28, 1863 Army of the Potomac Broadside - Gettysburg

0.00

Item No. SQ2973594

Offered here is an interesting and important original document from the Civil War. General Orders No. 67 appeared under the Army of the Potomac header and was dated June 28, 1863, just three days prior to the battle of Gettysburg. Having just been ordered to succeed General Joseph Hooker in command of the Army, General George G. Meade found himself in a position in which several men had previously failed. With Confederates in Maryland and Pennsylvania, the stakes were never higher. Meade's message to the troops reads:

By direction of the President of the United States, I hereby assume command of the Army of the Potomac.

As a soldier, in obeying this order--an order totally unexpected and unsolicited--I have no promises or pledges to make.

The country looks to this Army to relieve it from the devastation and disgrace of a hostile invasion. Whatever fatigues and sacrifices we may be called upon to undergo, let us have in view, constantly, the magnitude of the interests involved, and let each man determine to do his duty, leaving to an all-controlling Providence the decision of the contest.

It is with just diffidence that I relieve in the command of this Army, an eminent and accomplished soldier, whose name must ever appear conspicuous in the history of its achievements; but I rely upon the hearty support of my companions in arms to assist me in the discharge of the duties of the important trust which has been confided to me.

George G. Meade
Major General Commanding

General Orders such as this were often printed in the field by the Army's portable printing presses that began operation in 1863. Documents were also printed in local Virginia print shops near the Army, and in larger print shops in Washington and other cities. For more fascinating information about the Army of the Potomac's printing processes, Google "Civil War Field Printing" to find the National Museum of American History's informative page on the topic.

The circular measures about 5" x 8" and has two slits in the left margin used for placing the document in a binder. The paper is in excellent sturdy condition, not stiff, and not particularly delicate. Light wear to corners and edges. Remnants of album-mounting on reverse.

Add To Cart