1865 Letter - 6th New York Cavalry from Camp Parole - Peace Negotiations? - Sherman in South Carolina

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1865 Letter - 6th New York Cavalry from Camp Parole - Peace Negotiations? - Sherman in South Carolina

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Item No. SQ3785018

This is an interesting 1865 Civil War letter written and signed by Sergeant Wesley Langes of the 6th New York Cavalry, then in Annapolis, Maryland at a camp for paroled prisoners of war awaiting exchange. Langes, who was captured the previous summer at Trevilian Station, wrote to his brother in Canisteo about his plans to sneak home for a visit. He also discussed the possibility of a negotiated peace then taking place in Virginia (Hampton Roads Conference), as well as General William T. Sherman's advance through the Carolinas. The letter reads, in full:

Feb. the 2. 1865
Camp Parol, Annapolis, MD

Dear Brother
Yours of the 27 of Jan I received yesterday morning. It found me well. I went down to anapolis yesterday and drew me a Blanket. It s very muddy here at present, although the weather is very fine now. I should like to be at home and have another sleigh ride, but I dont think I shall be home time enough for that this winter. I have not applied for a furlough yet. I have written for my papers to get my back pay and Bounty. They have not come yet. If they come down I will soon be home. if they Dont come at all I shall come before long. If I get my money I shall let you have two hundred Dollars to use and one hundred for uncle John rowlan. But I am not sure of it yet. We are going to get two months Pay here soon and all them who gets their Descriptive lists before we are mustered for Pay will receive their back pay and installments. I Do not care about it on my account, but should like to let you have it to use. I was very lonesome at first when I came back, but I am getting over that. You did not say whether the Girls was at home or not. Tell them I should like to hear form them. Tell Mary if she lets that fellow stay all night she must start him home in the morning. I Dont suppose the Girls up there ever thought how bad it made me feel to come away down south and leave them. I tell you it made me feel kinder waterish around the eyes, although it has not efected my eyesight much worth speaking of.

There is not much said about the exchange of Prisoners, although it is my opinion that their will be an exchange next month. Their has been some excitement lately about Peace, but Jeff says they will fight untill we acknolledge their independence, which in my opinion will be a long time. If they refuse this chance of Peace they will miss their mark, for they will never have another chance. I suppose the armies are all lying still unless Sherman is moving. He will surely go through South Carolina in the Spring if not before. I have not much news this time and theirfore will close, excusing your short letter and hoping here from you again soon. Good by for the present.

Wesley Langs

Also included is the letter's original cover made out to Langes's brother, William, in Canisteo, Steuben County, New York. It has a 3-cent stamp and a February 2 Annapolis postmark.

The letter was written upon three pages of a  5" x 8" bifolium stationery sheet. The paper is in good sturdy condition, not stiff, and not particularly delicate even at the folds, where creases remain. Very minor toning.

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