1862 Letter - 32nd Massachusetts After Second Bull Run - "Folks at home can’t realize how soldiers are used"

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1862 Letter - 32nd Massachusetts After Second Bull Run - "Folks at home can’t realize how soldiers are used"

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Item No. 5519416

Offered here is an interesting 1862 Civil War letter written by Private Theodore P. Churchill of the 32nd Massachusetts Volunteers. Written on September 11, between the Battles of Second Bull Run and Antietam, Churchill mentions that his brother, Frederick S. Churchill of the 18th Massachusetts, was missing and presumed captured at Bull Run [he was later confirmed to have been killed in the battle]. He also mentions several other wounded men. He closes the letter determined, still, to crush the rebellion, but he would die December 14 at Potomac Creek, Virginia, of disease. The letter reads, in full:

Upton’s Hill Sept 11 1862

Dear Father,

I thought I would write a line to let you know how we are getting along. We have been lying in camp here for nearly a week so that we have got recruited up some from the late marches which wore us down pretty well. I have been sick for a few days, but am feeling pretty well now. I had a letter from [Sister] Charlotte last night. She said you had just heard that Fred was missing. He was wounded in the side by a piece of a shell as the boys of his company told me the next morning after the fight. But not badly, they thought. Jordan is in Washington wounded [died of wounds September 14]. and Rufus Wright is probably dead, but I hope that he will be heard from soon alive and well [he later returned]. I saw Ed. [Brother Edmund F. Churchill] & Frank the other day. They well and hearty, but I was sorry to see them out here for it is killing work to most anybody taking colds and sleeping outdoors nights without any shelter at all. Folks at home can’t realize how soldiers are used, but there is no grumbling for where this such a large army they can’t all be furnished with tents. The stars and stripes have floated over us through our long marches and may they ever float over. Float till this rebellion is crushed from the land and the south comes under the same government that it was before the war, and the stars and stripes float from the North pole to the South. Throughout every state in the union and may I have the strength to help carry them there. And I hope that every traitor North and South will meet his death either by the bulls or the gallows. I don’t think of any more so Good Bye.

From your Son
T. P. Churchill
Co A 32 Reg Mass Vol
Washington
D.C.


The letter was written upon three pages of a 4 3/4” x 8” stationery sheet. It is in excellent condition with very little wear to edges and corners. Little foxing and toning. Includes original cover postmarked September 14 from Washington with a 3-cent stamp and addressed to his father Isaiah Churchill in Plympton, Massachusetts.

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