1861 Letter - 4th Vermont Soldier Hopes There Will Be No Attack at Manassas

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1861 Letter - 4th Vermont Soldier Hopes There Will Be No Attack at Manassas

179.99

Item No. SQ1898253

Offered here is an interesting Civil War soldier letter written by Private Charles C. Kinsman of the 4th Vermont Volunteers. Kinsman was a private when he wrote this letter in November 1861, but was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant before resigning his commission in April 1863. The letter was written shortly after Kinsman’s enlistment while he recovered from “Bilious fever” (likely malaria). Kinsman described two large reviews of troops, his opinions on General Winfield Scott, and his hope that Manassas, which he considered to be an impenetrable fortress for the rebels, would not be attacked. The letter reads, in part:

Camp Advance Virginia Nov 14th / 61

Dear Parents and Sister
Again I take Pen to let you know how I am. I am gaining slowly and think I shall be able to do duty in a week or so but I am pretty weak as my writing will show. I have had the regular Bilious Fever and in this country it takes a good while for a man to regain his strength longer than it does in Vt…. I have had very good care and as good living as could be expected. [Henry D.] Searles has got the measles slightly as they are going very light in our Regt. We have but two men in the Hospital and they will be well enough to come back to camp in a few days. Our Co have all of them that are well gone on Piquet today. How I wanted to go with them but could not…. We have some 30 cases measles in our Co so one half of us are off duty now. I tell you I am pretty poor now and those who call me poor in Vt if they could see me now would think I was poor. I do not know how much I weight but I think 130 would weight me now. We had a review yesterday on our grounds & near here of about 17,000 and tomorrow there is to be one of 4 Divisions probably nearly 80,000 there will then be present. All this we think indicates a movement soon but do not know anything about but it seems as though something ought to be done soon to decide this momentous question. The Resignation of Gen Scott I think will tend to hasten the matter as he was for moving slow and sure. But I hope we never shall be led directly to Manassas for if we are a great many Thousands of us never will see Home and friends again for it is one of the strongest holds in America and if well manned will send a great many men to Eternity in a little while….

I am and hope to remain as ever your very dutiful Son

Charles C. Kinsman

The letter was written upon three pages of a four-page stationery sheet measuring about 7 1/4” x 9 1/4”. The paper is thin, but in very good condition. Light wear to edges and corners. Creases where originally folded.

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