December 1862 Letter by Lieutenant Wallace McGrath, 15th Ohio - Two Weeks Before Stones River - "The enemy had outflanked us on our right flank"

letter-wallace-mcgrath-15th-ohio.jpg
letter-wallace-mcgrath-15th-ohio1.jpg
letter-wallace-mcgrath-15th-ohio2.jpg
letter-wallace-mcgrath-15th-ohio.jpg
letter-wallace-mcgrath-15th-ohio1.jpg
letter-wallace-mcgrath-15th-ohio2.jpg

December 1862 Letter by Lieutenant Wallace McGrath, 15th Ohio - Two Weeks Before Stones River - "The enemy had outflanked us on our right flank"

195.00

Item No. 0176193

An interesting December 1862 letter written by Lieutenant Wallace McGrath of the 15th Ohio Volunteers. Just nineteen years old, McGrath and his men had just moved their camp a little ways to the rear. “Genl Kirby Smith of the Confederate Army was north of the Cumberland River,” he wrote, adding that if the Rebels succeeded in turning the Union flank, his brigade “will have to fall back towards Louisville again.” McGrath also wrote about a woman back home in Columbus who was to be married to another man, but still secretly yearned for McGrath. The letter reads, in its entirety:

Head Qrs 6th Brigade
Near Nashville Tennessee.
Dec 10th 1862

Brother George
Having a little time now, I thought I would answer your last letter which I received some days ago, but have not had time to answer as yet.

We have just changed camps to a 1/2 a mile to the war from where we were camped for the last three weeks. I do not know what it means for us to fall back for a half of a mile, but I suppose that in doing so we have a stronger line of defense. Maj. Genl. [Alexander M.] McCook last evening told Genl [August] Willich that the enemy had outflanked us on our right flank, and that Genl Kirby Smith of the Confederate Army was north of the Cumberland River, and trying to cut off our railroad communication & supplies, but I do hope that it is not true. The rebels that outflanked us on our right flank it is said are bearing towards Fort Donelson and will gain possession of the Cumberland River, and if they do the Army of the Cumberland (ours) will have to fall back towards Louisville again to get supplies to subsist upon.

I do hope this damned war will soon be over, as I am most Christly tired of it, but I swear it does not look much like being over soon if they can outflank us in this.

The reason I did not write to Miss Julia Denier in my last was because I did not think of it, but I will do so tomorrow.

George, I think you are darned afraid I will tell someone a secret, if you are so cautious about telling me how matters stand between yourself and Julia. If you are going to marry her and do so, why I will congratulate you because I think she will make you a good wife. Although I think you are both too young as yet. Now this is talking very plain to you, but George remember I am a friend of yours and I want to see you get along well and do the right thing.

Now George I want to tell you something and I don’t want you to say anything about it, not even to Julia.

I received a letter from Mary St. Clair yesterday in which she said, after saying a great many other things, that she had a notion of getting married, but she did not want anyone in Columbus to know anything about it, as she said that if she did marry the man she would have to elope with him. She also said that the man she was about to marry, she did not (Love) and that the one she had given her heart to was in the Army and had probably lost it long before this, down in the land of Dixie.

Now George you probably understand this. If you do not I will explain it to you some other time.

Good bye write soon.
Your true Friend
Wallace McGrath

The letter was written on three pages of a stationery sheet measuring about 7 3/4” x 9 3/4” and is in excellent condition. Very light and even toning. Creased where originally folded.

Add To Cart