Group of Four 1863 Letters by Private Edward D. Carpenter, 8th Connecticut

letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut1.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut2.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut3.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut4.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut8.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut5.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut6.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut7.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut1.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut2.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut3.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut4.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut8.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut5.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut6.jpg
letter-edward-d-carpenter-8th-connecticut7.jpg

Group of Four 1863 Letters by Private Edward D. Carpenter, 8th Connecticut

225.00

Item No. 8580162

A group of four letters written in 1863 by Private Edward D. Carpenter of the 8th Connecticut Volunteers, a regiment that fought with the IX Corps throughout the war. Written between January and November, the letters contain typical soldier concerns about camp, pay, furloughs, sickness, etc. Each letter was written on a stationery sheet measuring about 5” x 8” and all are in very good condition. Transcripts for each letter are found below:

Letter No. 1

Falmouth Va Jan 24th 1863

Uncle Stephen and Aunt Polly
I shall expect some letters from around home before long because I write often enough, but having a little money to send home I had no other way of sending it but in a letter. I will also send you a picture of myself. It is not a very good one, but as good as I can get here. There is a little defection on the coat. I suppose in the varnish or something else. I will enclose twenty dollars in two ten dollar notes. You can break one of them and keep five dollars yourself and let Aunt Polly have three and Margrett two dollars as a little compensation for making up boxes for me. And take the cost and express of the box out of the other bill and if any is left keep it for me. I shall send some more for safe keeping in my next letter. If we are in these parts in sap time I may find a box of sugar.

I guess I will not send the picture in this letter, but will write to the children and send it to you in that letter.

I have no news to write so I will close. From your affect. Nephew
E. D. Carpenter

GIve my respects to all the friends and direct as before.

Write soon.

Letter No. 2

Suffolk Va Apr 1st 1863

Uncle Stephen and friends
Having a little money to send home I thought I could not send it home safer than in a letter. We were paid off last Sunday and received four months pay, which ought to have been fifty two dollars, but which was only thirty nine dollars. Thirteen dollars was taken out for overplus clothes that I drew more than I was allowed for a year.

I have been thinking for some time that I should like a stock a growing if it would pay as well as money at 5 percent.

If you thought it would pay to lay out a little money in yearlings, sheep or any young stock and hire them pastured on some good pasture. If you think it would pay and you feel able to do it I will send you twenty five or thirty dollars for it and if you are not able I do not want you to do anything about it. Have you heard of or seen [First Sergeant] John Cooley in your parts? It is about time he started to come back. Did you send my flute by him? I will enclose ten dollars in this and will send the other in other letters. I have not any news to write so I will close.

From your affect. Nephew
E. D. Carpenter

Direct to Suffolk Va.

I am well. Write and let me know how you all get along.

Letter No. 3

Portsmouth Va Nov 7th / 63

Dear Uncle and Aunt
I received your letter written by Mrs. Stowe and was very glad to hear from you, but sorry to hear that you were so poorly and that Aunt Polly had so much to do. There is nothing in the world would please me more than to be home this fall so that I might help you. I have been in the Hospital three or four days with a sore throat, which I thought was the quimsy, but I guess it will come off all right. I shall try to get a furlough but as there are so many ahead of me it will be some time, if I get one at all. The weather is quite pleasant here now. We had a pretty heavy frost last night.

Nov 8th / 63
I came out of the hospital this morning and am quite well as to sore throat. Albert Clemmons was here today on a short visit. We have not been paid off yet, but expect to be in a few days. My overdrawn clothing will come out of it this time. When we are paid I think I shall send for a box and you can get Charles’s folks to put it up. I will wait just now and see how things turn out. How are Aunt Harriet’s folks get along? As well as the rest of the friends in G———? I had a little news to write so I will close. From your affect. Nephew E. D. C.

Write soon and direct as before.

Letter No. 4

Portsmouth Va Nov 30th / 63

Uncle and Aunt
Your letter of the 24th was received and I was glad to hear from you. I am well and think I shall come home on a short furlough before long. About the box, I was not much disappointed as I thought Charles would not sent it and I was a fool for sending for it, for there is plenty of chance for spending my money here if I cannot [send] to home.

If you are a mind to, you may send me the boots and two pair of stockings. If you send them, start them before long as I may get them before I come home and if there is any money left of the fifteen dollars, put it in a letter and send it in the box. I have no news of importance to write so I will close by hoping to see you before long. I remain your affect. Nephew
E. D. Carpenter

Direct as before.

Add To Cart