CDV + Archive of 12 Letters by Corporal William B. Smith, 3rd New Jersey - Killed in Mule Shoe Attack at Spotsylvania

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CDV + Archive of 12 Letters by Corporal William B. Smith, 3rd New Jersey - Killed in Mule Shoe Attack at Spotsylvania

2,650.00

Item No. 5387442

A wonderful archive of a CDV and twelve letters, eleven of which were written by Corporal William B. Smith of the 3rd New Jersey Volunteers, with the twelfth written by a comrade, informing Smith’s parents of his death. In May 1861 Smith, just fifteen years old, enlisted in Company B of the 3rd. He was promoted corporal on January 1, 1863 and was killed in the Mule Shoe attack (the “Bloody Angle”) at Spotsylvania Court House on May 12, 1864. The letters, almost all of which were written on patriotic stationery, come predominantly from 1862, along with one from 1863, and two from May 1864; one written by Smith just a week before his death and the other written by Smith’s friend, Private William Gibson, notifying Smith’s parents of their son’s fate. The letters are very interesting and include quite a bit of action and some really interesting details. One early letter describes how a spy was captured and executed on the brigade parade ground. “I think he got what he deserved,” wrote Smith. In the same letter Smith described how his company set an ambush for rebel cavalry: “Our first lieutenant with 18 men placed two strong wires across the road. The top one to take the rider in the neck and the lower one to take the horse below the knee.” Several letters described skirmishes with Rebel troops near Washington and on the Virginia Peninsula, along with observations about Union Generals George McClellan, Joe Hooker, William B. Franklin, and Philip Kearny. The longest and most interesting letter of the group is #5, in which Smith described the March 1862 skirmishing leading to his company being among the first to enter the Confederate depot at Manassas, where Rebel troops in their haste had failed to burn all of the supplies:

Well there was plenty of everything you could mention. Talk about fresh eggs and ham and butter, tea and coffee in abundance, and we done justice to it. I tell you they set fire to two trains of cars but they would not burn. They burnt the machine shop down and all they could. We all got new shirts, drawers, stockings, handkerchief, and letters and likenesses of all descriptions that they left behind them. Peanuts plenty and candy and big Bowie knives 2 feet long, sharp at both edges. They belong to the Manassas Rangers. It was laughable to see us strutting about with a long knife and a Captain’s coat on. I tell you we had a good time of it.

Other letters describe light skirmishes that took place during the Peninsula Campaign in 1862. The last letter from Smith was written to Jim on May 3, 1864, on the eve of the Overland Campaign and just nine days before his death. In the letter Smith states that “they have got to move soon and fast if they want us boys to do anything for our country for we have only got 22 days to do it in,” noting the number of days left in his enlistment. Very sadly, the final letter was to Smith’s parents from Private William Gibson, informing them of the details of their son’s death. Gibson wrote that the 3rd New Jersey had suffered casualties of 187 men and eight officers. Only seven remained in the company, he said, and five of those were about to head home at the expiration of their enlistments. Of Smith, Gibson wrote, “I know it is hard to part with one like him. I feel it myself very bad, but we must put our trust in him that giveth and he that taketh away. I am tired of seeing the horrible sights that we are compelled to witness on the battle field.”

The eighth letter in this archive was written on a particularly interesting stationery sheet. The entire first page is a pre-printed original poem called “Jersey Blues of 1862" written by Private William T. Foster of the 4th New Jersey Volunteers, a sister regiment of Smith’s 3rd New Jersey. The full text of the poem can be found at the bottom of this listing.

The CDV is of Smith in civilian clothing. On the reverse is the backmark of Philadelphia photographer Isaac S. Lachman. There are several notes written in period ink, including Smith’s name and birthdate and some details of his war service, including his muster-in date, that he was wounded and captured at Salem Heights, Virginia, on May 3, 1863, and his death at Spotsylvania just over a year later. The carte measures about 2 1/2” x 4” and is in good condition with moderate but even toning and clipped top corners. A note on the Lachman backmark—the 984 North Second Street address wasn’t used by Lachman until 1867, so this CDV would have been produced from a negative, likely by Smith’s parents, and likely for the memorial purpose of recording his personal details and war record.

The letters are in excellent condition as shown. Most have very light toning, if any at all. Minor foxing on some letters. One of the letters on the McClellan stationery has a couple of ink stains. They are of the typical 5” x 8” size, with some slightly smaller. All are creased where originally folded.

Excerpts from each of the letters follow. Full electronic transcripts are available upon request.

Letter No. 1 written to William’s brother, James Smith, who served in the 23rd Pennsylvania - January 8, 1862 - Fort Worth near Alexandria - Capture and execution of a spy - Setting an ambush for Rebel cavalry

. . . We have had a great time making our tents secure from the cold. We have placed stockades 6 feet long 2 feet in the ground. Then raise our tent on the top of them. It gives plenty of room inside. We have got stoves and tis as comfortable as can be expected. I suppose you heard of the deserter that was shot in the presence of our brigade. Our colonel was out on a scout when they came across him. They [were] after some cavalry that had been annoying our pickets. They come to a rest about 6 miles beyond our lines when this cavalryman came up to them. He thought they were Secesh and said he could tell them where they could take our pickets. Our colonel said “that is just what I want, can I trust you?” He said yes then one of our fellows said “let me look what kind of revolvers you have,” then handed it to our colonel. He then said “dismount you damned traitor or I will blow your damned brains out.” We then bound his arms and sent him to camp. He was tried and found guilty and was shot on our brigade [parade] ground. I think he got what he deserved. Well our party went on and got information which way the cavalry came. They divided into three parties. Our first lieutenant with 18 men placed two strong wires across the road. The top one to take the rider in the neck and the lower one to take the horse below the knee. They then awaited the coming [of] the colonel and the strong party on the road. We expected them to come, then the wire was to catch them in the retreat. But they came the road that the wire was on. The third party was beyond the wire. Well they came up about 12 o’clock. They passed the first party before they came up to the wire. Well they are up to it with their pistols in hand. The first one struck it then their captain hollered what the hell is the matter there, go ahead. Then our fellows stepped up and gave it them in right good will. Their captain hollered rally boys, but they could not. We killed 6 and wounded a great many. We captured their first lieutenant and brought him down to camp. We lost one killed and 2 wounded. I bet they will never forget it. They will look after the wire system. . . . We have been mustered and expect our pay next week sometime. Jim when you get your pay don’t let them play the game on you again. Give my best respects to all the boys and accept the same yourself, so no more at present.

Letter No. 2 to Smith’s parents - Likely February 9, 1862 - Fort Worth - A visit to brother Jim - Promotions in Company B

. . . I was over to Washington to see Brother James yesterday and got back this morning. James is well and sends his love to you likewise. I saw West. I did not see Clady nor Fox. They are doing very well. I enjoyed myself very well while I was there. Dear Mother I got the box all right and the contents was alright and came in first rate. My drawers fit me very well and my boots are first rate. We have two shoemakers are in our regiment, so I can get them mended when the need [arises]. We expect our pay next Monday. Then I will send my money the same way as Mr. Martin sends his. Dear Father we have had a change in our officers. [Franklin L.] Knight is promoted to captain Co B and our orderly to second lieutenant and Lieutenant [William N.] Evans the first.

Letter No. 3 to Smith’s parents - February 18, 1862 from Fort Worth - Victory at Fort Henry - Picket duty

Fort Worth Feb 18th 1862

We had rather a rough time on picket for the first day or two. We went to work and built two log houses. We stayed ten days. We had plenty of good wood and water. We are getting short of wood in camp. The teams cannon draw it. The roads are impassable. . . . We was not molested on picket. Any way at all we go by signals. By day and night allow no one [is] to pass our lines. We have [a] line right across the country. Each regiment joins each other. We had 6 reliefs that took us 2 hours on and 8 hours off. The reserve built the houses and cut the wood. As for the weather, it is miserable and wet and muddy. I would much rather be on picket than in camp. Tell Father that we are busy with the bayonet exercise. They cannot drill brigade drill for mud. There is great rejoicing all through the camp with the recent news [of the victory at Fort Henry]. . . . We have nothing to complain of but mud and wet and snow, but that will soon be over and I think the way they are going it will soon be all over with them. We may have to go toward Manassas. If we do we are prepared for them at any time. If we could get the artillery along we should have been there long ago had the roads promoted. As for the parade in Philadelphia on the 22nd, it will not beat our review at Bailey Cross Roads. As for the beef and plum pudding and double XX ale, the officers can manage that very well, but I would not go a beggin’ around our tents I can assure you. I think I have told you all at present. I was very sorry for Fox but such things must be. Our regiment is in first rate health. There is a few cases in the hospital, them not serious. Give my love to all inquiring friends. Mr. [Alfred] Marshland and [Edward] Trussell desire to be remembered to Father. They often talk about him. So now I must conclude with my everlasting love to Father and Mother and I hope they will excuse me for not writing. Tell Edwin I am very much obliged to him for anything he may think fit to send me. So no more at present from your dutiful son W. B. Smith

Letter No. 4 to brother James Smith - Written on same day as letter 3 - February 18, 1862 from Fort Worth - 200 Rebel cavalry surrendered

Fort Worth Feb 18 1862

Dear Brother, I now take pen in hand to write a few lines to you hoping they will find you all well. You would think I had entirely forgot you. We have just come off picket duty. That is 3 days ago. We had a pretty rough time of [the] first day or two, but I would rather be on picket than in camp. We are now drilling the bayonet exercise. That makes us kind of stiff. We had a bully time on picket. We stayed out ten days out but nothing disturbed us at all. We was about 12 miles from camp. Our lines extend right across the country. Each regiment joins each other, so on right through the country. The general comes around every three days. We signal by days and allow no one to pass our line at night. I had a letter from Mother today and she said that she and Mrs. Wise went to Fox’s funeral and they had 4 company and 4 drums and one fife. Well Jim, I suppose you hear how the Secesh are getting it. I think they will soon have a plenty if they keep on. You must tell me how you like your new camp. As for ours we are knee deep in mud all the time. I think we may have to go toward Manassas. Just now as I am writing the report came into camp by the officer of the outpost that 200 of the Rebel cavalry came over to us. They say they have had nothing to eat for two days and are tired out. They gave in their arms and horses and everything else. This took place a few miles on our right near Fort Lyons. Our fellows gave them plenty of something to eat. I think they was very wise in so doing. . . . I hope when you write you and all the boys will be in good health and looking forward [to] a bit of good fun with the Rebels. . . . There is to be a great parade in Philadelphia on the 22. It will be my birthday on the 5 of next month. Sweet 16. So if we was only home, but one week for fun.

Letter No. 5 to Smith’s parents - March 1862 - Fort Worth - Smith and his company are among the first to enter the abandoned Rebel depot at Manassas following a skirmish

. . . You would think [it] strange I did not write before this, but we have been running around the country a good deal. We left our camp on the 7th and got into Manassas on the 11th in the morning at 9 o’clock after a long and tedious march. It [was] going out on flanking party that tired us. We came up with Rebels a little distance from Fairfax Station on the 9th. We had one company of Lincoln Cavalry with us. Our General came up to us and said “boys take a rest” while the cavalry took a scout in advance of us some 3 hundred yards ahead. They was between two hills out of sight. They had bulley quarters. They had just released their companions 1 hour before. There was about 2 hundred Maryland Cavalry called Tigers. The Lieutenant of the Lincoln Cavalry [1st New York Cavalry] said to our General “now or never.” The General wanted to surround them but the Lieutenant wanted to get at them, so he did, and our General [Philip] Kearny said he never saw a prettier charge in his life. They got right amoung them cutting away with their sabers. They had good rifles but they wheeled around without even firing them off. We took 17 prisoners and killed 4. The wounded made off toward Manassas. They killed our favorite Lieutenant [in] the first charge. He had 6 bullets in him. The corporal had two horses shot from under him. He mounted again and followed them but could not come up to them. The General took his name and made him sergeant. We followed them in the morning at 3 o’clock. They was a little too fast for us. They burnt all the bridges to stop us from coming up to them. They had a camp at Union Mills and sent parties to do all this. We lost nothing at all not even a man. They shot so wild they threw their coats and rifles away and run like so many deers. They are bug cowards. If they had stood we had only 3 companies near to them at the time. I thought when our Colonel ordered our Captain to march our company up to the forts in skirmishing order we should get it. Then we was about 2 hundred yards in advance of the regiment, they following us up but they had all gone, not one to be seen until we got to the junction. Then we see 2 scouts and fired at them but they rode off fast as they could. We could see the way [their] army had moved by the dense smoke they left behind them burning everything as they went along. Our General came up and we gave him three hearty cheers. He gave us 4 hours to get anything we wanted before he would allow the regiment to come in. He said we deserved more for our cool courage. Company B is the right stuff. Well there was plenty of everything you could mention. Talk about fresh eggs and ham and butter, tea and coffee in abundance, and we done justice to it. I tell you they set fire to two trains of cars but they would not burn. They burnt the machine shop down and all they could. We all got new shirts, drawers, stockings, handkerchief, and letters and likenesses of all descriptions that they left behind them. Peanuts plenty and candy and big Bowie knives 2 feet long, sharp at both edges. They belong to the Manassas Rangers. It was laughable to see us strutting about with a long knife and a Captain’s coat on. I tell you we had a good time of it. About 12 o’clock up came Major General McClellan with 4,000 cavalry. We gave him 3 cheers. General Franklin was with him and looked as sulky as a bull because we got into the much talked [about] stronghold [of] Manassas before his New Yorkers. We was the first company in. Let them say what they will. The order came for us to march to Centreville about 9 miles from Manassas. I can assure you our boys doesn’t like going back at all. It was very unpleasant to all of us but we had to take our position in the army. We had gone too fast for them. We stop there that night then marched to Fairfax Court House and the night following marched to camp. . . . They said we was going right away on the boats at Alexandria the next morning. But here we are yet expecting to go every day. When we shall go, I do not know, nor where, but I will write the first time I get the chance to. How I should [have] liked to have gave them a good dressing [down]. Dear Parents you must not feel uneasy about me. I can make out with the rest of them so long as I keep my health and strength. . . . General Kearny is the best friend on the Potomac to volunteers. He tries to take good care of them and feeds them good. He said '‘my men must have fresh bread and not crackers on the march,'‘ or after we get to where he can get it.

Letter No. 6 to Smith’s parents - April 14, 1862 - Fort Ellsworth near Alexandria - Difficult march to Warrenton

Dear Parents, I now take my pen in hand to inform you where [we] now are and where we have been to. We have been up to Warrenton Station 40 miles from Alexandria. We had a very bad time of it. We had three very wet days and nights. The small tents we have are very good against the heavy dews, but they are very little use against snow and rain and mud like we had to contend with. We was ordered back and the Penn. Reserve took our place. We met them on Bull Run Battle field. We marched 40 miles in 2 days with our knapsacks on. I tell you it made the strongest men stiff in the joints. We arrived here yesterday at 1 1/2 o'clock . The order was for to be ready to go on board at 10 o’clock in the morning to go to Yorktown, but here we are yet expecting to go every moment. I do not know where we shall go yet. It is hard to tell. They move us so many times. The weather is fine at present and we are all busy washing our clothes to be ready for another trip somewhere or other. The boys seem very much disappointed at not going off this morning. I had a letter from Jim from Fortres Monroe. He was well and West and all the boys send their love also. Mr. Henry Hosten he is in Washington and young Henry is Sergeant in the first Jersey Cavalry, but I do not [know] where they are now. . .

Letter No. 7 to Smith’s parents - April 18, 1862 - Aboard transport Thom Warner

. . . we are on board of the Thom Warner bound for Yorktown. We [got] on board last night and the pay master is paying [us] off now. You must apply to Mr. Farr No. 255 South Third St, Phila. and you will receive the sum of 15 dollars that I have sent you. Dear Mother you must [not] make yourself uneasy about me. We are well provided for in every respect. Everything goes on in first rate style. There is a great deal of waiting and standing under arms. We have 15 boats with our Division. The Artillery and Cavalry are all on board of schooners and each steam boat takes two in tow. The weather is very fine indeed, so we look forward for a comfortable trip and I hope the next time I write to you we shall have gave the Rebels a good whipping, which I am sure they will get. So I think I have told you all at this time. Mr. Martin is well and sends his respects to you all. Give my love to all my acquaintances. I may get the chance to see Jim once more. So now I must conclude with my everlasting love to Father and Mother and Brothers. So no more at present from your Son.
Wm. B Smith

I will write the first chance I get. They say that our letters will not go at all times, but yours will come to you. Good Bye and God bless you all.

Letter No. 8 to Smith’s parents - May 14, 1862 - Cumberland Landing on the Pamunkey River

. . . We left the Warner in the night on the 7 and stood under arms until daylight, then took our usual breakfast, crackers and coffee. Then we had to go to the woods to cut off the Rebels from the main road to Richmond, as Gen McClellan was driving them up. We held our own until our Gun Boats silenced their battery, then they all left. We had only [General William B.] Franklin’s Division to defend ourselves with. We was reserve within one hundred yards of the lines. Our loss was severe. There was a good many killed [and] wounded but we do not know the number. The Rebels loss was three to our one. We found them all day long in the woods dead and dying. We are marching toward Richmond. The weather has been very hot. The boys threw away their knapsacks and tents and our coats. Sometimes they make telegraph poles out of us through the woods to communicate to one Regiment to another. We are now waiting orders to march. We see Gen McClellan yesterday. He looks first rate. We gave him three hearty cheers. He gave the response by waving his cap. We had a slight skirmish yesterday. Only one killed and six taken prisoner. Our cavalry made a charge on theirs. They then opened their masked battery. It was a few miles ahead of us. We repulsed them with a heavy loss and captured a great many of them but that is nothing [compared to] what we intend to do in a few days, as we expect to have a large battle before we reach Richmond. We are anxious to be at them. We are well prepared for them. I have seen Baxter’s Fire Zouaves [72nd Pennsylvania], but Pete Clady was not with them. He is in the hospital sick. I [saw] Jim Handley and all the rest of the boys. We are on the extreme right of the Army and [General David B.] Birney must be on the left as we do not see or hear anything of them. We may meet them in a day or two. . . .

Letter No. 9 to Smith’s parents - June 26, 1862 - Camp near Fair Oaks - Observed Battle of Oak Grove

I am happy to say that I enjoy good health at present, though there is a great many taken down in our Regt and all others but thank God I have escaped all yet. We have crossed the river and are now encamped on the old battle ground of the 31 of last month and the first of June. We was out on picket on the 23. We was close to the enemy but all was quiet until yesterday morning. Our fellows opened upon them and drove them a mile back. Our whole line shelled from the right to the left. We was ordered out but took no part in it. We supported General [Edwin V.] Sumner’s Corps until 8 o’clock then returned to camp. We saw them carry the dead and wounded past us. Our loss way very small to theirs. We all thought that it [would] bring on a general engagement. This morning morning the pickets kept up a constant fire all night, but all is quiet up to this. The weather is very hot indeed in the daytime and very cool at night. If we get much more ground from them we shall soon be able to see Richmond. There is a rumor here that they are fighting among themselves. I see one man that was shot through both legs. He belonged to the Irish Brigade. [General Daniel] Sickles he said “never mind that’s nothing” and joked away as if nothing ail[ed] him. One Lieutenant was shot dead while taking in his wounded. . . . We expect a general engagement every day and hope that it will soon come and be over. I think they will get enough before we get to Richmond if they get it as they got it yesterday. I received the paper and cake. I would like you to send me a box or two of Wright’s Vegetable Pills coated in a paper as medicine is very scarce. Out [here] the doctor will give you nothing but game.

Letter No. 10 to Smith’s parents - February 23, 1863 - Camp at White Oak Church - Visit to the 26th Penna. - Hooker takes command

. . . We have just come off picket duty. We was out three days. The first day was very wet. The other two days were like spring. The very night we got in it commenced to snow in good earnest. It must be two feet deep on the level. It makes it very bad for us to get wood. . . . Father, me and [William] Gibson was over to the 26 Penn Regt. We see Capt [Benjamin Chew] Tilghman that was on Frankfort Road and Palmer St. With us he is now Lieut Col of the Regt. He told me to give his respects to you. George Carrs that was second Lieutenant there was discharged from the U[nited] States services for cowardice before the enemy. That is what they told us there. I have not seen Jim since I last wrote to you. . . . Since Gen [Joseph] Hooker has taken command we have fared a great deal better. We get fresh bread 3 or 4 times a week now and other things we did not used to have. Gibson had a letter from Maryland. He is in Frederick Maryland yet he says he is much the same as he was. [Samuel] Martin is well and sends his respects to you. Dear parents I think as the weather is now we can make no move anyway as the roads are all mud. There was a report out here that our division was ordered to Fortress Monroe and from there to Suffolk Va but I am certain that we couldn’t move 2 miles now. So we must wait until good weather comes. . . .

Letter No. 11 to brother Jim - May 3, 1864 - Camp near Hazel River - Continuous rumors of a major movement (beginning of Overland Campaign) - Only twenty-two days remaining in Smith’s enlistment - Jim’s regiment, the 23rd Penna., is guarding prisoners on Johnson’s Island in Ohio - 10th New Jersey joins the brigade

. . . I have ben having continual reports of moving and today the Capt came down and gave us orders to be ready to move tomorrow morning. So I think we will take some of these days but they have got to move soon and fast if they want us boys to do anything for our country for we have only got 22 days to do it in. I am glad your Regt has been left on the island and I hope they will keep you there till next August as I think you will have it a little better now. The rest of your brigade arrived here about a week ago and I was over there the day after they came as I thought you was there too, but I was agreeable disappointed when I found not. I am glad to hear Lerry foot is getting along well. . . . I have never seen Jim Handley since you and he came over to our camp last fall. The 10th NJ Regt joined our brigade about a week ago and I went over to Is[rael E.] Vannaman but he did not know me, and I hardly knew him so I guess I will not go over anymore. [William] Gibson, [William J.] Mills, Strong, and all the rest of the boys sends respects to you. [Thomas W.] Clarke has returned to the company and Jack sends their respects to their friends in your company, and so does [Lewis C.] Hong and Mills. . . . In 22 days I will bid Uncle Samuel adieu.

Letter No. 12 from Private William Gibson to Smith’s parents - Spotsylvania Court House - Details of the death of William B. Smith - 187 regimental casualties in the May 12 attack - Only 7 men let in the company

May 17th 1864
On the Battle Field Near Spotsylvania Court House Va

Respects Friends
I now take up my pen to write a few lines to you hoping they may find you well as it leaves me. Well in health, but very sore from the wound I received in my right side, but thanks be to God it is getting along very well now. I wish that I could say the same of my comrades. I suppose that by this time you have heard of the losses that our Regt has sustained. Our losses in the Regt 187 men, 8 officers, with the Col and Adjutant. Our brigade suffered bad indeed. It pains me very much, Mr. [and] Mrs. Smith, to tell you that your son William is no more. He fell on Thursday morning the 12 of May. Jacob Wise of our co[mpany] was with him. The ball went in his left side and came out against his cartridge box on the right side. He had another through his head. He never knew what hurt him. At the time we charged the Rebels earthworks he fell and may God rest his soul. All the boys in our company grieves his death very much indeed. We are now taken rest. We are entrenched and have laid here two days and no fighting, but we cannot tell how long it may be before we may have to follow our late comrade. We have 4 killed dead in the co[mpany]. Fred Mervine is one. 15 wounded and two missing. There is only 7 men in our company now. And 5 of them goes out on the 25 of May. Well friends, I must conclude this sorrowful letter and I hope that God may give you strength to bear it as well as you can. I know it is hard to part with one like him. I feel it myself very bad, but we must put our trust in him that giveth and he that taketh away. I am tired of seeing the horrible sights that we are compelled to witness on the battle field. In conclusion, accept of my symphony in your distress. It is all that I can do. Give my love to my wife when you see her. I have wrote to her before. Give my respects to Edwin and both Mr. and Mrs. Smith accept of my very best regards. So no more at present. Write and let e know how you are as soon as you can. I remain your respectful
William Gibson
Co B 3rd Regt N J Vo

PS I hear that the 23 P[ennsylvania is] guarding prisoners, so your son James will be all right. I hope so. Good bye.

“Jersey Blues of 1862” by W. T. Foster, Co. C, 4th N. J. Vols. (Pre-printed first page of the eighth letter in the archive)

“Tis not quite a century since this great nation started,
But numerous rights had been infringed ere we from others party;
The reason why we parted thus, and called us independent,
Will always make us fight for right, and right o’er wrong transcendent;
’Twas then for right we fought ‘agains, though called Yankee Doodle,
And taught our foe by many a blow that us he could not cuddle;
’Twas right ‘gains might that gave us strength, and made us
prove quite handy,
To sing beneath our stars and stripes our Yankee Doodle Dandy.

‘Twas not for tea, but Liberty, ‘twas for our cots, not cotton;
We could not cringe, or right infringe, or truth we’d cast no spot on;
Then many a sire with patriot fire within his bosom burning,
Fell, nobly fell in this good cause, our Liberty while earning;
No stamp act, tea, or cotton tree, can now our rights inference, sir,
No, no, our stars and stripes must float in spite of king or cotton,
Though all the banners of the earth lie buried and forgotten.

And now when traitors raise their hands our glorious flag to mar, sir,
We Jersey Blues of ‘62 will strike for stripes and stars, sir;
And like our noble patriot sires, from whom we are descendant,
Maintain through every conflict fierce those stripes and stars resplendent;
Yes, though Jeff. Davis, with his host of blanket hearted traitors,
Should join dark hands, throughout this land, with other agitators,
We’ll let them feel the freeman’s power ‘against every fopedudle,
While we will rally round our flag and sing our Yankee Doodle.

If Wigfall, Wise, or Beauregard, or Toombs, don’t soon grow wiser,
They’ll soon find out their treason’s dead, when Jersey boys surprise her;
For though we now appear to sleep beside our artist’s easel,
Our fabric we are building up—they cannot catch a weasle;
The forts we’ve built they’ll attack, so many guns we’ve mounted;
The million hearts they have woke up these gamesters never counted;
Then Yankee Doodle quick we’ll play through all our land, sir,
’Till ever all, both land and sea, we shall in union stand, sir.

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