April 1865 Letter by Private George C. Nichols, 25th Massachusetts - Returned from Confederate Prison - Lincoln Assassination - "The Rebs Will Feel Big Over It, But It Won’t Help Their Case a Bit"

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April 1865 Letter by Private George C. Nichols, 25th Massachusetts - Returned from Confederate Prison - Lincoln Assassination - "The Rebs Will Feel Big Over It, But It Won’t Help Their Case a Bit"

320.00

Item No. 3494584

A very interesting 1865 letter written by Private George C. Nichols of the 25th Massachusetts Volunteers to his sister, Clara, in Westminster. It was written from Worcester, Massachusetts, on April 16, 1865—the day before the regiment was mustered out of service and just two days after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Nichols began the letter recalling that it had been only a few months since he had been released from a Confederate prison in South Carolina (he had been captured at Drewry’s Bluff, Virginia, in May 1864 and was imprisoned in the Florence Stockade). He then commented on the assassination, saying, “That was a daring deed to perform to shoot old Abe. I hope they will get the fellow that done it. The Rebs will feel big over it, but it won’t help their case a bit.” John Wilkes Booth was still at large at the time of the letter’s writing, and would not be cornered until April 26. The letter reads:

Worcester April 16th 1865

Sister Clara
I now take my pen to write you a few lines to let you know that I am well and hope this will find you the same and the rest of the folks. I am just thinking where it was fore months ago to day I left the Johnnies and came on board the transports at Charleston. I got over here all safe but did not go to Sophia’s that day I came over. I went down Friday to the City. Sophia is at work in the shop. She is well but Georgie is not very well. He has got the rash. I guess it was rough on President Lincoln and Seward and his son. That was a daring deed to perform to shoot old Abe. I hope they will get the fellow that done it. The Rebs will feel big over it, but it won’t help their case a bit. Our folks have been to easy with them ever since the war commenced. I can’t think of any news to write from here. Everything is about the same as when I went away from here. I herd that there had been a order to discharge all men in Hospitals. If that is so I may be out of this before long. I hope so but you can’t tell any thing by what you hear now days. One Doctor Lyon that doctors here was talking with some ladies in the hospital the other day and one of the Ladies says the Soldiers have every thing in good shape here. And he said that they did but they were a mean, low, poore set of fellows and could not get a living if they were at home. One of the boys herd him say it and he says you are a god damn lyer and the son of a gun could not say a word and he sneaked off. He will get his nose nocked if he don’t look out what he says.

I can’t think of any more news to write from here. Write soon and tell all the news from home.
Your George
to Clara

The letter was written on three pages of a stationery sheet measuring about 5” x 8”. It is in very good condition with light toning and foxing. It is creased where originally folded. Also included is the original stamped cover with April 18 Worcester postmark.

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